Customer Education

Samsung SwiftKey Vulnerability - You may be seeing reports of a new exploit targeting a vulnerability in the SwiftKey keyboard pre-installed on multiple models of the Samsung Galaxy including the S5 and S6.  The SwiftKey keyboard looks for updates over unencrypted lines, in unencrypted text.  The vulnerability can be used by attackers to gain system privileges and obtain private information such as bank login credentials. 

If you use a Samsung Galaxy phone, as a security best practice, we recommend that your device is configured to automatically receive security updates from Samsung.  If you have questions about these updates, please contact your carrier.  We also recommend that you minimize the use of unsecure wireless networks when accessing private information, such as mobile banking, until the security update for this vulnerability is made available. 

Please click here to be redirected to a statement Samsung has issued regarding this vulnerability.  

Beware of Juice Jacking! - Please beware of Juice Jacking, a popular tactic that fraudsters are using to compromise the security of your mobile device.  In this particular scheme, criminals utilize free power charging stations, commonly located in airports, bus terminals, and coffee bars, to gain access of passwords, photos, and other personal information stored on your device.  

Fraudsters tamper with these unsecured charging stations by installing a small computer that syncs with your device once it’s connected via the supplied USB cord.  After your device is sync’d to the criminal’s computer, they can steal your private information stored on your device as well as remotely access your phone again any time in the future.  In addition to stealing the information stored on your device, they can also infect your Smartphone or tablet with malicious code and/or malware. 

Please use caution and avoid becoming a victim of this or any type of fraud!  The safest route for charging your device away from home is to use your own power cord and plug it into a regular electrical outlet.  Battery powered mobile charging devices are also safe alternatives.  If you must use a random charging kiosk, the safest option is to completely power off your device before plugging it in.

Recent "Tech Support" Scam -  Please be aware of a recent fraud trend that is circulating in our area. Customers have reported receiving an unsolicited phone call from a person claiming to be a representative of a reputable computer software or Anti-virus company. This caller will claim the customer’s computer is infected with malware and ask to be granted Remote Access to log into their PC and resolve the issue. Once this access is granted, the perpetrator can easily take control of their PC and infiltrate their Online Banking system, access saved passwords, download malicious software, and more. Don’t become a victim! Click here to learn more about this scam and find out how to protect yourself.

 Recent Text Message ScamPlease be aware of a recent text message scam circulating in the area.  Victims have reported that they are receiving text messages claiming to be from their Financial Institution notifying them that their debit card is blocked.  They will likely ask you to reply to the message or call and verify your debit card number.  These are fraudulent messages.  Central Bank and Trust Co. will not text you and ask you to verify your card number.

 We currently have a service which monitors card activity for red flags.  You may receive a call to verify large or unusual transactions.  If we are unable to verify these transactions, your card will be blocked until we can verify the activity.  We will not call or text to ask you to verify your card information.  If a lost or stolen card is reported to a branch location over the phone, we may ask you to come into a branch in order to dispute charges and/or request a new card.

If you have any questions regarding this notice or other scams, please contact us.